Root Rot Problems in Marijuana

By Simi February 17, 2013 5151 Views Leave a comment Go to comments

One of the most insidious problems that might appear in your marijuana plants is that of root rot. In the case of hydroponic (water) growing, this is an easily detected problem. The roots of the plants will start to turn brown instead of the creamy white color of a healthy root system. Within a short period of time, they will truly rot, causing them to appear slimy. They will also start to emit a strong odor.

Root Rot Problems in Marijuana

Root rot is less evident in marijuana plants that are grown in a soil medium. These plants will start dropping leaves for no apparent reason, and will begin to wither and die. You will also notice the body of the plant dropping and seeming very lifeless. Additionally, you will notice that your plants are just not thirsty when you water them; this usually means that you have watered them too much and the bottom of your pots are standing in water.

Root rot is a very serious condition that can easily lead to the ruination of your entire crop of marijuana. In fact, many growers will not even attempt to treat this problem if a large number of plants are affected. Instead, they will trash the plants and start over. If you are growing on a smaller scale, though, it is usually worth it to try to save the plants. While the rotted roots will not usually recover, a plant that is still strong enough in general will generate a new root system once the issue is addressed.

The very first thing to do is to change the growing environment. If you have a hydroponic medium, be sure to change you water on a weekly basis, flushing the old water out and replacing it with fresh, pH balanced water. This weekly water change will also expose the roots to the air for a short time. Your plants love this, as long as you don’t let the roots dry out.

In a soil-based growing medium, you need to make sure the plant pots do not have standing water in the bottoms of them. If this is the case, you would do well to pull the plant out of the pot, soil and all, and let it be exposed to the air long enough to drain the excess water and dry out some.

After you have removed the waterlogged plants, clean all of your pots very thoroughly with an antibacterial agent to make sure there is no bacteria lingering. Make sure your individual pots have an adequate drainage hole. It often helps to spread a few small pebbles in the bottom of each pot to encourage drainage. Using fresh, dry soil, repot the plants as soon as possible.

Once you have corrected these problems, you should also treat the root system with one of a variety of additives available. The one I have had the most success treating root rot with is Subculture B; it cured the existing root rot in some plants, and prevented it from occurring again. There is also Piranha, Great White, Rooters, and Plant Savers. 

Posted in: Cannabis Grow Tips
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Brod February 17, 2013 at 10:30 AM Reply
I have been growing my own marijuana plant for 5 months now and this blog on the root rot problems of marijuana is very beneficial for me as well to the others. Thanks for posting!
Sallie February 17, 2013 at 10:58 AM Reply
Interesting blog about root rot problems in marijuana. My plants' root are showing discolorations lately. Do you think they are suffering from this problem? I need your advice.
Yasmin February 17, 2013 at 11:01 AM Reply
Sallie, I believe those are signs that your marijuana plants may well be suffering from root rot problems for it was stated above that the roots of the plants will start to turn brown instead of the creamy white color of a healthy root system. Have them checked again and learn about other signs that could possibly help you detect the problem.
Erwin February 18, 2013 at 4:54 AM Reply
They said that one of the most insidious problems that might appear in your marijuana plants is that of root rot. How can that affect cannabis plants?
Dean February 18, 2013 at 4:54 AM Reply
Actually erwin, The roots of the plants will start to turn brown instead of the creamy white color of a healthy root system. If you look at it, you can see changes or discoloration as well.
DJ rey February 18, 2013 at 4:55 AM Reply
In addition, for just a short period of time, they will truly rot, causing them to appear slimy. They will also start to emit a strong odor. Really, it can damage your plant!

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